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Keywords: neuron
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Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2021) 49 (5): 2221–2227.
Published: 08 September 2021
...Jessica Mitchell; Jeffrey A. Chao Memory-relevant neuronal plasticity is believed to require local translation of new proteins at synapses. Understanding this process has necessitated the development of tools to visualize mRNA within relevant neuronal compartments. In this review, we summarize...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2017) 45 (1): 261–267.
Published: 15 February 2017
...Elisa Greggio; Luigi Bubacco; Isabella Russo Evidence indicates that leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) controls multiple processes in neurons and glia cells. Deregulated LRRK2 activity due to gene mutation represents the most common cause of autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease (PD). Protein...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2014) 42 (4): 1229–1237.
Published: 11 August 2014
... at sites of localized translation, e.g. neuronal dendrites [ 6 ] or leading edges of migrating fibroblasts [ 7 ]. At least some family members shuttle to and from the nucleus [ 4 , 8 ] and can, during cell stress, accumulate in the nucleus [ 5 , 8 ] or in cytoplasmic foci, e.g. stress granules [ 5 , 9...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2013) 41 (6): 1618–1624.
Published: 20 November 2013
... on the individual mitochondrion and the cell within which they reside. Neurons are post-mitotic energy-dependent cells and, as such, are particularly vulnerable to alterations in cellular bioenergetics and increased stress that may occur as a direct or indirect result of mitochondrial dysfunction. The trafficking...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2013) 41 (6): 1541–1545.
Published: 20 November 2013
...Karen F.S. Bell Neurons are more vulnerable to oxidative stress than astrocytes, the reasons for which have yet to be fully elucidated. Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms which contribute to this enhanced vulnerability is key to efforts aimed at ameliorating neuronal health...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2013) 41 (6): 1365–1382.
Published: 20 November 2013
...Michael D. Ehlers Among the largest cells in the body, neurons possess an immense surface area and intricate geometry that poses many unique cell biological challenges. This morphological complexity is critical for neural circuit formation and enables neurons to compartmentalize cell–cell...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2013) 41 (1): 241–244.
Published: 29 January 2013
... cells. Functioning of the brain relies on synapses, and certain patterns of synaptic activity can change the strength of responses at sparse groups of synapses, to modulate circuits underlying associations and memory. These local changes of the synaptic physiology in one neuron driven by another have...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2012) 40 (1): 179–183.
Published: 19 January 2012
... cAMP fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) neuron pH Depolarization of excitable cells leads to Ca 2+ influx and significant decreases in intracellular pH [ 10 ]. These changes in pH can be attributed to the actions of the PMCA (plasma membrane Ca 2+ -ATPase) Ca 2+ /H + exchange...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2012) 40 (1): 282–286.
Published: 19 January 2012
...Petra Popovics; Alan J. Stewart The most recently identified PLC (phospholipase C) enzymes belong to the PLCη family. Their unique Ca 2+ -sensitivity and their specific appearance in neurons have attracted great attention since their discovery; however, their physiological role(s) in neurons...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2011) 39 (4): 917–919.
Published: 20 July 2011
...Simon Paine; James Lowe; Lynn Bedford; R. John Mayer Chronic neurodegenerative disease is characterized by extensive regional loss of neurons in the brain and neuropathological hallmarks in surviving neurones. Genetic modelling by overexpression of hallmark proteins does not produce extensive...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2009) 37 (6): 1228–1232.
Published: 19 November 2009
...Alessandro Fantin; Charlotte H. Maden; Christiana Ruhrberg Blood vessels and neurons share guidance cues and cell-surface receptors to control their behaviour during embryogenesis. The transmembrane protein NRP1 (neuropilin 1) is present on both blood vessels and nerves and binds two structurally...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2009) 37 (6): 1171–1178.
Published: 19 November 2009
... that NRP1 is essential for neuronal and cardiovascular development, little is known concerning the molecular mechanisms through which NRPs mediate the functions of their ligands in different cell types. NRP1 forms complexes with its co-receptors and is required for optimal function, but NRPs lack a clearly...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2009) 37 (1): 200–203.
Published: 20 January 2009
... described for its capacity to bind to the calcium-binding protein, ALG-2. Alix regulates neuronal death in ways involving interactions with ALG-2 and with proteins of the ESCRT (endosomal sorting complex required for transport). Even though all Alix interactors characterized to date are involved...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2008) 36 (6): 1277–1281.
Published: 19 November 2008
... an absence of Cp results in neurodegeneration: is the iron accumulation a primary or secondary injury? Although it is attractive to invoke an iron-mediated oxidative stress mechanism for the neuronal injury and degeneration in aceruloplasminaemia, our data suggest limited redox injury in the brains of mice...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2007) 35 (5): 1247–1251.
Published: 25 October 2007
..., semi-independent of electrical activity, and allows the diffusion of peptides to distant targets. The peptide oxytocin regulates many behaviours; in particular, it inhibits food intake. Centrally, oxytocin is released in large amounts by the dendrites of hypothalamic magnocellular neurons. This mini...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2007) 35 (5): 1064–1068.
Published: 25 October 2007
...D.P. Mohapatra; K.-S. Park; J.S. Trimmer Voltage-gated K + channels are key regulators of neuronal excitability. The Kv2.1 voltage-gated K + channel is the major delayed rectifier K + channel expressed in most central neurons, where it exists as a highly phosphorylated protein. Kv2.1 plays...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2006) 34 (3): 399–403.
Published: 22 May 2006
... an independent lipoprotein transport system in which glial cells produce ApoE (apolipoprotein E)-containing lipoproteins that are thought to deliver cholesterol to neurons for axonal growth and repair. We have shown that ApoE-containing lipoproteins generated by glial cells stimulate axon extension. ApoE...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2005) 33 (6): 1350–1353.
Published: 26 October 2005
... and how this phosphorylation may control its function in the SV life cycle. 1 To whom correspondence should be addressed (email m.cousin@ed.ac.uk ). 13 6 2005 © 2005 The Biochemical Society 2005 exocytosis neuron phosphorylation plasticity synaptophysin tyrosine...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2004) 32 (5): 682–684.
Published: 26 October 2004
...J.M. Scholey; G. Ou; J. Snow; A. Gunnarson IFT (intraflagellar transport) assembles and maintains sensory cilia on the dendritic endings of chemosensory neurons within the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans . During IFT, macromolecular protein complexes called IFT particles (which carry ciliary...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2003) 31 (4): 880–884.
Published: 01 August 2003
... in the mammalian central nervous system. It has become apparent that these control processes involve complex sets of protein–protein interactions and many of the proteins responsible have been identified. We have been working to visualize AMPAR movement in living neurons in order to investigate the effects...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2003) 31 (1): 45–49.
Published: 01 February 2003
...M.P. Stavridis; A.G. Smith Pluripotent embryonic stem cells can give rise to neuroectodermal derivatives in culture. This potential could be harnessed to generate neurons and glia for cell-replacement therapies in the central nervous system and for use in drug discovery. However, current methods...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2002) 30 (2): 183–189.
Published: 01 April 2002
...T. Teesalu; A. Kulla; T. Asser; M. Koskiniemi; A. Vaheri Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is expressed by many types of neurons in the developing and adult rodent brain. We have now mapped tPA transcripts and protein in the human central nervous system using tissue arrays and find widespread...