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Keywords: amino acid
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Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2014) 42 (4): 866–872.
Published: 11 August 2014
... and the ‘peripheral’ MUPs with a greater degree of heterogeneity and approximately 20–30% non-conserved amino acids. This review focuses on differences between the two MUP sub-groups and categorizes these changes in terms of molecular structure and pheromone binding. As small differences in amino acid sequence can...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2013) 41 (4): 951–955.
Published: 18 July 2013
... and the Rags play a central role. The presence of amino acids is a strict requirement for mTORC1 activity. The heterodimeric Rag GTPases localize mTORC1 to lysosomes by their amino-acid-dependent interaction with the lysosomal Ragulator complex. Rheb is also thought to reside on lysosomes to activate mTORC1...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2012) 40 (1): 37–43.
Published: 19 January 2012
...Nicholas T. Ktistakis; Maria Manifava; Priya Schoenfelder; Sergio Rotondo The simple phosphoinositide PtdIns3 P has been shown to control cell growth downstream of amino acid signalling and autophagy downstream of amino acid withdrawal. These opposing effects depend in part on the existence...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2009) 37 (1): 295–298.
Published: 20 January 2009
...Sara Roos; Theresa L. Powell; Thomas Jansson The mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) signalling pathway functions as a nutrient sensor, both in individual cells and, more globally, in organs such as the fat body in Drosophila and the hypothalamus in the rat. The activity of placental amino acid...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2009) 37 (1): 289–290.
Published: 20 January 2009
.... Identification of the Rag (Ras-related GTPase) family of GTPases as mediators of amino acid signalling to mTOR is an important step towards our understanding of this mechanism. 1 To whom correspondence should be addressed (email sabatini@wi.mit.edu ). 18 9 2008 © The Authors Journal...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2009) 37 (1): 291–294.
Published: 20 January 2009
... the role of PHDs in the cellular response to amino acid deprivation, a process regulated by mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin). The precise mechanism whereby amino acids are signalling to mTOR is not fully understood. Given that 2-oxoglutarate is a limiting co-substrate for PHD activity during normoxia...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2007) 35 (5): 1302–1305.
Published: 25 October 2007
... and phosphorylation state of signalling molecules involved in anabolic and catabolic responses. Amino acids, hormones and physical activity appear to be the major short-term physiological regulators of muscle mass, mainly through their actions on protein synthesis and breakdown, on a time scale of minutes to hours...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2007) 35 (5): 1187–1190.
Published: 25 October 2007
...C.G. Proud Amino acids regulate signalling through the mTORC1 (mammalian target of rapamycin, complex 1) and thereby control a number of components of the translational machinery, including initiation and elongation factors. mTORC1 also positively regulates other anabolic processes, in particular...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2007) 35 (2): 401–404.
Published: 20 March 2007
... is a single-binding, centre-gated pore rather than a channel. 1 To whom correspondence should be addressed (email antonio.toninello@unipd.it ). 26 10 2006 © 2007 The Biochemical Society 2007 agmatine amino acid guanidine compound mitochondrion polyamine transport...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2005) 33 (1): 261–264.
Published: 01 February 2005
...P. Poulsen; B. Wu; R.F. Gaber; Kim Ottow; H.A. Andersen; M.C. Kielland-Brandt Saccharomyces cerevisiae senses extracellular amino acids using two members of the family of amino acid transporters, Gap1 or Ssy1; aspects of the latter are reviewed here. Despite resemblance with bona fide transporters...