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Keywords: aging
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Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2023) 51 (5): 1811–1846.
Published: 01 September 2023
.... Unfortunately, mitophagy declines with age. Many age-associated diseases, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, are characterized by the accumulation of damaged mitochondria and oxidative damage. Therefore, activating the mitophagy process with small molecules is an emerging strategy for treating multiple...
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Biochem Soc Trans (2022) 50 (5): 1389–1402.
Published: 28 October 2022
...Eric K. F. Donahue; Elizabeth M. Ruark; Kristopher Burkewitz Advances in public health have nearly doubled life expectancy over the last century, but this demographic shift has also changed the landscape of human illness. Today, chronic and age-dependent diseases dominate the leading causes...
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Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2019) 47 (4): 997–1003.
Published: 18 July 2019
... and mammals, a pattern of global DNA hypomethylation coupled with increased methylation levels at some specific genomic regions arises at specific developmental stages and in certain abnormal cells, such as mammalian aging cells and cancer cells as well as some plant epigenetic mutants. Here we provide...
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Biochem Soc Trans (2016) 44 (4): 1101–1110.
Published: 15 August 2016
... information to enable adaptability, is central to this whole process. Critically, hormesis could improve mitochondrial quantum efficiency, improving the ATP/ROS ratio, whereas inflammation, which is tightly associated with the aging process, might do the opposite. This all suggests that to achieve optimal...
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Biochem Soc Trans (2015) 43 (4): 627–631.
Published: 03 August 2015
... in the tissue microenvironment. However, both aging and neurodegeneration involve an up-regulation of processes, such as oxidative stress, inflammation, somatic mutations, and reduction in growth factors in neural tissues, which threaten the robust functioning of NSCs. Nevertheless, recent evidence also...
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Biochem Soc Trans (2015) 43 (4): 734–739.
Published: 03 August 2015
...Sian M Henson Aging is accompanied by immune decline leading to increased incidence of infections and malignancies, given the demographic shift of humans towards an older age the identification of strategies for the manipulation of immunity is an important goal. Evidence implicates mammalian target...
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Biochem Soc Trans (2015) 43 (4): 572–578.
Published: 03 August 2015
... in steroid biosynthesis. 1 Correspondence may be addressed to either author (email andrew.midzak@mail.mcgill.ca or vassilios.papadopoulos@mcgill.ca ) . 16 3 2015 © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited 2015 14-3-3 proteins adrenal aging brain cholesterol gonads...
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Biochem Soc Trans (2014) 42 (4): 965–970.
Published: 11 August 2014
...Brian McDonagh; Giorgos K. Sakellariou; Malcolm J. Jackson Skeletal muscle represents a physiologically relevant model for the application of redox proteomic techniques to dissect its response to exercise and aging. Contracting skeletal muscles generate ROS (reactive oxygen species) and RNS...
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Biochem Soc Trans (2014) 42 (4): 917–921.
Published: 11 August 2014
... of quantitative tools that reveal extensive redox-sensitive processes in bacteria and eukaryotes, and (iii) the discovery of a link between early exposure to oxidants and aging. Our future research programme aims to generate an integrated and system-wide view of the beneficial and deleterious effects of ROS...
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Biochem Soc Trans (2014) 42 (3): 607–608.
Published: 22 May 2014
... Biochemical Society 2014 aging biochemistry bioengineering regenerative medicine stem cell tissue regeneration The language of biochemistry is changing. Phrases such as ‘intellectual property space,’ ‘tractable targets’ and ‘clinical trial’ have joined the biochemist's vernacular...
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Biochem Soc Trans (2014) 42 (3): 663–669.
Published: 22 May 2014
...M. Carmen Ortells; William M. Keyes Adult tissue homoeostasis requires continual replacement of cells that are lost due to normal turnover, injury and disease. However, aging is associated with an overall decline in tissue function and homoeostasis, suggesting that the normal regulatory processes...
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Biochem Soc Trans (2014) 42 (2): 419–424.
Published: 20 March 2014
..., HAGH (hydroxyacylglutathione hydrolase), has a regulatory p53-response element. Glo1 is linked to healthy aging, obesity, diabetes and diabetic complications, chronic renal disease, cardiovascular disease, other disorders and multidrug resistance in cancer chemotherapy. Mathematical modelling...
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Biochem Soc Trans (2013) 41 (6): 1483–1488.
Published: 20 November 2013
...-maria.cuervo@einstein.yu.edu ). 2 7 2013 © The Authors Journal compilation © 2013 Biochemical Society 2013 aging autophagy chaperone lysosome neurodegeneration proteotoxicity Figure 1 CMA and neurodegeneration CMA is responsible for the selective degradation of cytosolic...
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Biochem Soc Trans (2013) 41 (5): 1331–1334.
Published: 23 September 2013
...Carola Stockburger; Christopher Kurz; Konrad A. Koch; Schamim H. Eckert; Kristina Leuner; Walter E. Müller The metabolic enhancer piracetam is used in many countries to treat cognitive impairment in aging, brain injuries, as well as dementia such as AD (Alzheimer's disease). As a specific feature...
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Biochem Soc Trans (2012) 40 (5): 1042–1046.
Published: 19 September 2012
... as well as impaired dopamine D 2 receptor-mediated functions. Whereas LRRK2 −/− brains are normal, LRRK2 −/− kidneys at 20 months of age develop striking accumulation and aggregation of α-synuclein and ubiquitinated proteins, impairment of the autophagy–lysosomal pathway, and increases in apoptotic cell...
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Biochem Soc Trans (2011) 39 (6): 1770–1774.
Published: 21 November 2011
...Alice L. Ye; Needhi Bhalla Aging was once thought to be the result of a general deterioration of tissues as opposed to their being under regulatory control. However, investigations in a number of model organisms have illustrated that aspects of aging are controlled by genetic mechanisms...
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Biochem Soc Trans (2011) 39 (6): 1775–1779.
Published: 21 November 2011
...Xavier Nissan; Sophie Blondel; Marc Peschanski Progeria, also known as HGPS (Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome), is a rare fatal genetic disease characterized by an appearance of accelerated aging in children. This syndrome is typically caused by mutations in codon 608 (C1804T) of the gene...
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Biochem Soc Trans (2011) 39 (6): 1780–1785.
Published: 21 November 2011
...Derek T. Warren; Catherine M. Shanahan Accumulation of DNA damage is a major driving force of normal cellular aging and has recently been demonstrated to hasten the development of vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. VSMCs (vascular smooth muscle cells) are essential for vessel wall integrity...
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Biochem Soc Trans (2011) 39 (5): 1520–1526.
Published: 21 September 2011
...Ralf J. Braun; Benedikt Westermann Mitochondria play crucial roles in programmed cell death and aging. Different stimuli activate distinct mitochondrion-dependent cell death pathways, and aging is associated with a progressive increase in mitochondrial damage, culminating in oxidative stress...
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Biochem Soc Trans (2011) 39 (4): 933–938.
Published: 20 July 2011
..., we discuss the further contributions that knockin and similar approaches can make to understanding pathogenesis and how best to model disorders of aging in a short-lived mammal. To summarize the above, whereas overexpression of mutant transgenes can model some aspects of pathology, most notably...
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Biochem Soc Trans (2011) 39 (3): 819–822.
Published: 20 May 2011
...Ana M. Mata; María Berrocal; M. Rosario Sepúlveda AD (Alzheimer's disease) is an age-associated neurodegenerative disorder where the accumulation of neurotoxic Aβ (amyloid β-peptide) in senile plaques is a typical feature. Recent studies point out a relationship between Aβ neurotoxicity and Ca 2...
Articles
Biochem Soc Trans (2011) 39 (2): 460–465.
Published: 22 March 2011
... with a pharmacological inhibitor of the TOR pathway, rapamycin, can replicate those findings and improve aging in a variety of model organisms. The proposed underlying anti-aging mechanisms are down-regulated translation, increased autophagy, altered metabolism and increased stress resistance. 1 Correspondence...
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Biochem Soc Trans (2010) 38 (2): 539–544.
Published: 22 March 2010
...Maria Luisa Moro; Matthew J. Collins; Enrico Cappellini Biomolecules can experience aging processes that limit their long-term functionality in organisms. Typical markers of protein aging are spontaneous chemical modifications, such as AAR (amino acid racemization) and AAI (amino acid isomerization...
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Biochem Soc Trans (2009) 37 (5): 1050–1055.
Published: 21 September 2009
.... We summarize the evidence in support of the essential role that LDs play in longevity regulation and propose several molecular mechanisms by which these dynamic organellar compartments control the aging process in multicellular eukaryotes and yeast. 26 3 2009 1 These authors...
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Biochem Soc Trans (2009) 37 (4): 819–823.
Published: 22 July 2009
... established and are key to our understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms in COPD and may be important for the development of new therapies. There is a relationship between chronic inflammatory diseases and aging, and the processes involved in aging may provide a novel mechanism in the pathogenesis of COPD...
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Biochem Soc Trans (2009) 37 (3): 479–481.
Published: 20 May 2009
... family of iron–sulfur-containing, 5′–3′ DNA helicases Biochem. Soc. Trans. 2009 37 547 551 aging cancer DNA damage DNA repair genome instability All cells contain a diverse range of repair pathways that have evolved to optimize their survival following damage to their DNA...
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Biochem Soc Trans (2009) 37 (1): 303–307.
Published: 20 January 2009
...Alessia Piazza; Marina A. Lynch In the last few years, several research groups have reported that neuroinflammation is one feature common to several neurodegenerative diseases and that similar, although perhaps less profound, neuroinflammatory changes also occur with age. Age is the greatest risk...
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Biochem Soc Trans (2007) 35 (5): 849–852.
Published: 25 October 2007
...-linking, leading to an understanding of how intracellular collagen-modifying enzymes affect the patterns of cross-links produced. An important distinction is made between the enzyme-mediated cross-linking, essential for optimum tissue function, and the non-enzymatic aging processes that generally lead...
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Biochem Soc Trans (2007) 35 (4): 683–685.
Published: 20 July 2007
.... 2004 32 103 111 actin aging cytoskeleton intervertebral disc mechanotransduction IVD (intervertebral disc) degeneration, the leading cause of age-related chronic axial low back pain [ 1 ], results in a dramatic change in cell metabolism and ECM (extracellular matrix) turnover...
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Biochem Soc Trans (2006) 34 (5): 743–745.
Published: 25 October 2006
...C.-C. Hung; E.J. Davison; P.A. Robinson; H.C. Ardley Intraneuronal inclusion bodies are key pathological features of most age-related neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. These inclusions are commonly characterized both by the presence of ubiquitinated...
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Biochem Soc Trans (2006) 34 (4): 581–582.
Published: 21 July 2006
... of this evidence and the putative mechanisms of intra-allelic telomeric mutation. 1 To whom correspondence should be addressed (email bairddm@cardiff.ac.uk ). 29 3 2006 © 2006 The Biochemical Society 2006 aging cancer intra-allelic mutation recombination telomerase telomere...
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Biochem Soc Trans (2005) 33 (6): 1260–1264.
Published: 26 October 2005
...C.W. Gourlay; K.R. Ayscough The actin cytoskeleton is central to many cell processes including membrane trafficking and generation of cell polarity. We have identified a role for actin in cell death and in promoting longevity of the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae . Aging in yeast appears...
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Biochem Soc Trans (2004) 32 (6): 1006–1007.
Published: 26 October 2004
...J.A. McKay; E.A. Williams; J.C. Mathers DNA methylation is one of several epigenetic mechanisms that play a regulatory role in genome programming and imprinting during embryogenesis. Aberrant DNA methylation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of diseases associated with aging...
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Biochem Soc Trans (2003) 31 (6): 1305–1307.
Published: 01 December 2003
... development or adulthood. These findings have demonstrated that pharmacological intervention in the aging process is possible and that these compounds can provide important information about the underlying mechanisms. To date, such interventions have targeted known processes rather than screening compound...
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Biochem Soc Trans (2003) 31 (2): 455–456.
Published: 01 April 2003
...A. Vasilaki; L.M Iwanejko; F. McArdle; C.S. Broome; M.J. Jackson; A. McArdle Skeletal muscle adapts rapidly following exercise by the increased production of heat-shock proteins (HSPs). The aim of this study was to examine the ability of muscle from adult and aged mice to produce HSPs following non...
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Biochem Soc Trans (2003) 31 (2): 444–446.
Published: 01 April 2003
...B. Zhang; S. Ye; A.A. Sayer; S.R. Hammans; S. Adio; L.J. Hinks; P.J. Smythe; D. Groot; C. Cooper; I.N.M. Day Somatic mutation in the mitochondrial genome occurs much more rapidly than in the nuclear genome and is a feature, possibly contributory, of the aging of cells and tissues. Identifying...
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Biochem Soc Trans (2003) 31 (2): 462–464.
Published: 01 April 2003
... for modifying some of the pathogenic processes themselves. In common with other structures, the tissues of the musculoskeletal system undergo many changes with aging, and some of the commonest skeletal disorders are seen in the elderly. The changes in bone lead to osteoporosis and fractures, whereas muscle...
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Biochem Soc Trans (2003) 31 (2): 449–451.
Published: 01 April 2003
...S.K. Butcher; V. Killampalli; H. Chahal; E. Kaya Alpar; J.M. Lord Previous work has demonstrated an age-related decline in neutrophil function, including a decline in phagocytic capacity, with age in healthy individuals. This decline in function may contribute to increased susceptibility...
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Biochem Soc Trans (2001) 29 (4): 436–441.
Published: 01 August 2001
... to properly assemble the Key words: aging, mitochondria, oxidative-phosphorylation dis- eases, respiration. 'Present address: Metropolitan State College of Denver, De- partment of Biology, Campus Box 53, P. 0. Box 173362, Denver, 2To whom correspondence should be addressed (e-mail poyton @spot.colorado.edu...
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Biochem Soc Trans (2000) 28 (2): 241–245.
Published: 01 February 2000
...R. A. Miller The hypothesis that cellular proliferation leads to telomere shortening, which in turn leads to replicative failure, which in turn leads to a failure of immune function in aged individuals, is here evaluated against the published evidence about the nature and pace of immune decline...