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Keywords: cancer
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Biochem J (2023) 480 (1): 1–23.
Published: 06 January 2023
...Walter Kolch; Dénes Berta; Edina Rosta RAS proteins regulate most aspects of cellular physiology. They are mutated in 30% of human cancers and 4% of developmental disorders termed Rasopathies. They cycle between active GTP-bound and inactive GDP-bound states. When active, they can interact...
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Biochem J (2022) 479 (13): 1429–1439.
Published: 04 July 2022
..., but not identical, because Ru(II) shows no evidence of forming intramolecular crossbridges in the DNA. The reaction is slow, and with excess Ru, intermolecular DNA crossbridges are formed. The addition of CORM-3 to human colorectal cancer cells leads to strand breaks in the DNA, as assessed by the alkaline comet...
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Biochem J (2022) 479 (12): 1375–1392.
Published: 24 June 2022
..., self-renewal capacity of epithelial stem cells, proliferation/expansion of basal keratinocytes, differentiation of stratified epithelia. In cancer, ΔNp63 is implicated in squamous cancers pathogenesis of different origin including skin, head and neck and lung and in sustaining self-renewal of cancer...
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Biochem J (2022) 479 (11): 1149–1164.
Published: 08 June 2022
... investigate its role in tumor cell growth both in vitro and in vivo. We focused our comparison of UCKL-1 kinase activity with UCK2 due to UCK2's efficient catalytic activity, its selective expression in tumor cells, and the identification of both UCKL-1 and UCK2 as potential biomarkers in multiple cancer...
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Biochem J (2022) 479 (1): 75–90.
Published: 14 January 2022
... autophagic cell death autophagy cancer necroptosis neurodegeneration Cellular recycling is essential for both survival and organismal homeostasis. These clearance mechanisms bidirectionally interact with cell death pathways either to prevent them or to promote cell destruction due to extensive...
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Biochem J (2021) 478 (20): 3791–3805.
Published: 28 October 2021
... explain the frequent re-expression of normally silent meiotic genes in a variety of human cancers. Correspondence: Urszula Lucja McClurg ( Urszula.McClurg@liverpool.ac.uk ) or Wee-Wei Tee ( wwtee@imcb.a-star.edu.sg ) Ultimately, the decision to enter into meiosis is vital for the creation...
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Biochem J (2021) 478 (8): 1485–1509.
Published: 21 April 2021
... be beneficial for diagnostic and prognostic applications in autoimmune diseases and cancer. Serum antibodies to Saccharomyces cerevisiae glycans can be used in the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease and differentiation between Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Elevated serum titers...
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Biochem J (2021) 478 (3): 597–617.
Published: 12 February 2021
...’ switchers that control different Hallmarks of Cancer including invasion and metastasis. Blockade of galectin–glycan interactions thus represents a novel strategy to halt tumor progression [ 7 ]. In this review, we will discuss the involvement of galectins in different hallmarks of metastasis...
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Biochem J (2021) 478 (1): 21–39.
Published: 08 January 2021
...Giulia Pinto; Inés Saenz-de-Santa-Maria; Patricia Chastagner; Emeline Perthame; Caroline Delmas; Christine Toulas; Elizabeth Moyal-Jonathan-Cohen; Christel Brou; Chiara Zurzolo Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive brain cancer and its relapse after surgery, chemo and radiotherapy appears...
Includes: Multimedia, Supplementary data
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Biochem J (2020) 477 (23): 4675–4688.
Published: 11 December 2020
.... Caputto ( bcaputto@fcq.unc.edu.ar ) * Current Address: CIBICI (CONICET), Departamento de Bioquímica Clínica e Inmunología, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Argentina. † Current Address: Stony Brook Cancer Center and the Department of Medicine, Stony Brook...
Includes: Supplementary data
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Biochem J (2020) 477 (19): 3649–3672.
Published: 05 October 2020
... found in pathological states. In the last few years, a role in cancer has been proposed, supported by the evidence that various oncoproteins undergo gain- or loss-of-function modifications upon S -nitrosylation. Here, we aim at providing insight into the current knowledge about the role of S...
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Biochem J (2020) 477 (15): 2893–2919.
Published: 14 August 2020
...Walaa E. Kattan; John F. Hancock The three human RAS proteins are mutated and constitutively activated in ∼20% of cancers leading to cell growth and proliferation. For the past three decades, many attempts have been made to inhibit these proteins with little success. Recently; however, multiple...
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Biochem J (2020) 477 (15): 2755–2770.
Published: 07 August 2020
... and mutations in these are pathogenic in cancer and a class of developmental disorders termed RASopathies. Emerging clinical evidences have now demonstrated a role for RIT1 in RASopathies, namely Noonan syndrome, and various cancers including lung adenocarcinoma and myeloid malignancies. While RIT1 has been...
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Biochem J (2020) 477 (14): 2715–2720.
Published: 29 July 2020
.... showed that when DNA is damaged by ɣ-radiation in cancer cells, LBR is lost causing chromatin structure changes and promoting cellular senescence. Cellular senescence is characterized by terminal cell cycle arrest and the expression and secretion of various growth factors, cytokines, metalloproteinases...
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Biochem J (2020) 477 (8): 1363–1366.
Published: 23 April 2020
... 2020 © 2020 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society 2020 cancer cell penetrating peptide lipid microdomains membranes therapeutics trafficking In a recent issue of this journal Eissa et al. highlight a novel membrane-active...
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Biochem J (2020) 477 (5): 905–923.
Published: 04 March 2020
...’ subfamily HECT and influences several crucial cellular processes, including innate immunity, proteasome processivity, and cancer metastasis. Here, we report the crystal structure of the HECT domain of UBE3C (amino acids (aa) 744–1083) with an additional fifty N-terminal amino acids (aa 693–743) at 2.7...
Includes: Supplementary data
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Biochem J (2020) 477 (1): 111–120.
Published: 08 January 2020
..., such as oligomers and amyloid fibrils. p53 is an essential tumor suppressor that is prone to such conformational transitions, resulting in its compromised ability to avert cancer. This work explores the biophysical properties of early-, mid-, and late-stage p53 core domain (p53C) aggregates. Atomistic and coarse...
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Biochem J (2019) 476 (20): 3053–3066.
Published: 28 October 2019
...Han-Sae Lee; Hye-Ran Seo; Shin-Ai Lee; Soohee Choi; Dongmin Kang; Jongbum Kwon The recovery from replication stress by restarting stalled forks to continue DNA synthesis is crucial for maintaining genome stability and thereby preventing diseases such as cancer. We previously showed that BRCA1...
Includes: Supplementary data
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Biochem J (2019) 476 (15): 2209–2219.
Published: 09 August 2019
...Catherine E. Scull; Yinfeng Zhang; Nichole Tower; Lynn Rasmussen; Indira Padmalayam; Robert Hunter; Ling Zhai; Robert Bostwick; David A. Schneider Over the past two decades, ribosome biogenesis has emerged as an attractive target for cancer treatment. In this study, two high-throughput screens were...
Includes: Supplementary data
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Biochem J (2019) 476 (6): 931–950.
Published: 22 March 2019
... from structural and signaling aspects to their associations with cancer, physiology, and development. Correspondence: Anna M. Schmoker ( aschmoke@uvm.edu ) or Bryan A. Ballif ( bballif@uvm.edu ) 11 1 2019 20 2 2019 4 3 2019 © 2019 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press...
Includes: Supplementary data
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Biochem J (2019) 476 (1): 39–50.
Published: 07 January 2019
... to those previously isolated by our group through protein immunization. The epidermal growth factor receptor ( EGFR ) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that is overexpressed and constitutively activated in up to 80% of solid cancers [ 1 ]. Following the development of small-molecule inhibitors, naked...
Includes: Supplementary data
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Biochem J (2018) 475 (24): 4011–4023.
Published: 21 December 2018
...) 2018 This is an open access article published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society and distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0 (CC BY-NC-ND) . brain hypoxia cancer cell toxicity hypertension melatonin prion encephalopathies...
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Biochem J (2017) 474 (24): 4219–4251.
Published: 14 December 2017
... development in cancer. Although microRNAs (miRNAs) are the most studied regulatory ncRNAs to date, and miRNA-targeted therapeutics have already reached clinical development, including the mimics of the tumour suppressive miRNAs miR-34 and miR-16, which reached phase I clinical trials for the treatment...
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Biochem J (2017) 474 (11): 1919–1934.
Published: 19 May 2017
...Moitri Basu; Isha Sengupta; Md Wasim Khan; Dushyant Kumar Srivastava; Partha Chakrabarti; Siddhartha Roy; Chandrima Das Enhanced migratory potential and invasiveness of cancer cells contribute crucially to cancer progression. These phenotypes are achieved by precise alteration of invasion...
Includes: Supplementary data
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Biochem J (2017) 474 (11): 1755–1768.
Published: 10 May 2017
... role of RUNX1. Furthermore, in solid cancers, RUNX1 is overexpressed compared with normal tissue, and RUNX factors have recently been discovered to promote growth of skin, oral, breast and ovarian tumour cells, amongst others. RUNX factors have key roles in stem cell fate regulation during homeostasis...
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Biochem J (2016) 473 (22): 4083–4101.
Published: 10 November 2016
... therapeutic targets in cancer and other indications [ 32 – 35 ]. The best-known compound targeting the UPS is the dipeptide boronic bortezomib (velcade) [ 36 , 37 ], a 26S proteasome inhibitor approved for clinical use in multiple myeloma [ 38 ]. Thalidomide and its analogues (lenalidomide-CC-5013...
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Biochem J (2016) 473 (20): 3545–3562.
Published: 11 October 2016
.... Correspondence: Larry H. Matherly ( matherly@karmanos.org ) or Zhanjun Hou ( houz@karmanos.org ) 29 4 2016 2 8 2016 11 8 2016 11 8 2016 © 2016 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society 2016 antifolate cancer facilitative transport...
Includes: Supplementary data
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Biochem J (2016) 473 (17): 2603–2610.
Published: 30 August 2016
...Unbin Chae; Sun-Ji Park; Bokyung Kim; Shou Wei; Ju-Sik Min; Jun-Hyeog Lee; Se Hoon Park; Ann-Hwee Lee; Kun Ping Lu; Dong-Seok Lee; Sang-Hyun Min XBP1 (X-box-binding protein 1) is activated in cancer and has a pivotal role in tumorigenesis and progression of human cancer. In particular, the XBP1...
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Biochem J (2016) 473 (16): 2531–2544.
Published: 11 August 2016
...Kathryn M. Taylor; Issa A. Muraina; Dylan Brethour; Gerold Schmitt-Ulms; Thirayost Nimmanon; Silvia Ziliotto; Peter Kille; Christer Hogstrand There is growing evidence that zinc and its transporters are involved in cell migration during development and in cancer. In the present study, we show...
Includes: Supplementary data
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Biochem J (2016) 473 (9): 1247–1255.
Published: 26 April 2016
... glucagon signalling that leads to increased β-catenin activity that can be reversed with the antihelminthic drug niclosamide, which has recently shown promise as a potential treatment of T2D (Type 2 diabetes). This novel finding could be useful in liver cancer treatment, particularly in the context of T2D...
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Biochem J (2015) 471 (3): 307–322.
Published: 16 October 2015
... the diseases of old age, including type 2 diabetes (T2D), cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer. Developing new ways to improve health in the elderly is therefore a top priority for biomedical research. Although our understanding of the molecular basis of these morbidities has advanced rapidly, effective...
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Biochem J (2015) 471 (2): 243–253.
Published: 02 October 2015
...)/mTOR [mammalian (or mechanistic) target of rapamycin] signalling pathway in cervical cancer cell lines. We provided evidence that activated Akt/mTOR pathway increased NPC1 degradation by ∼50% in C33A cells when compared with SiHa or HeLa cells. NPC1 degradation in C33A cells was reversed when Akt/mTOR...
Includes: Supplementary data
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Biochem J (2015) 471 (2): 267–279.
Published: 02 October 2015
.... cancer lipid signalling melanoma oxidative stress peroxiredoxin Compared with normal healthy tissue, tumour tissue displays many features which are common to different cancer types. Among these features is elevated ROS (reactive oxygen species) metabolism, which is the result of various...
Includes: Supplementary data
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Biochem J (2015) 469 (3): 421–432.
Published: 23 July 2015
...Marco Kloos; Antje Brüser; Jürgen Kirchberger; Torsten Schöneberg; Norbert Sträter Phosphofructokinase-1 (Pfk) acts as the main control point of flux through glycolysis. It is involved in complex allosteric regulation and Pfk mutations have been linked to cancer development. Whereas the 3D...
Includes: Supplementary data
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Biochem J (2015) 468 (1): 1–15.
Published: 05 May 2015
... microenvironment is not entirely understood owing to the complex cross-talk between pro-inflammatory and tumorigenic mediators such as cytokines, chemokines, oncogenes, enzymes, transcription factors and immune cells. These molecular mediators are critical linchpins between inflammation and cancer...
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Biochem J (2015) 465 (2): 195–211.
Published: 06 January 2015
...Fiona P. Bailey; Dominic P. Byrne; Daniel McSkimming; Natarajan Kannan; Patrick A. Eyers Protein phosphorylation lies at the heart of cell signalling, and somatic mutation(s) in kinases drives and sustains a multitude of human diseases, including cancer. The human protein kinase superfamily...
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Biochem J (2014) 461 (1): 1–13.
Published: 13 June 2014
...Ruiyang Yan; Andrew Hallam; Peter G. Stockley; Joan Boyes Cancers arise through the progression of multiple genetic and epigenetic defects that lead to deregulation of numerous signalling networks. However, the last decade has seen the development of the concept of ‘oncogene addiction’, where...
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Biochem J (2014) 460 (3): 317–329.
Published: 29 May 2014
... and the evolution of multicellularity. LD motifs also play roles in disease, such as in cancer metastasis or viral infection. First described in the paxillin family of scaffolding proteins, LD motifs and similar acidic LXXLL interaction motifs have been discovered in several other proteins, whereas 16 proteins have...
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Biochem J (2014) 460 (2): 141–156.
Published: 13 May 2014
... of what is termed the proteome today, before it became clear that at least 50% of all proteins, and probably even more, undergo phosphorylation during their lifespan. cancer casein kinase 1 (CK1) casein kinase 2 (CK2) family with sequence similarity 20C (Fam20C) genuine casein kinase (G-CK...
Includes: Supplementary data
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Biochem J (2014) 459 (2): e1–e3.
Published: 28 March 2014
... immunity by interfering with macrophage activation. Recent advances have highlighted a controversial role for LXR in cancer. In this issue of the Biochemical Journal , Wang et al. propose that LXR agonist directly controls IFN-γ (interferon-γ) expression, which limits tumour growth. This protective effect...